2019 FAIRWAYS CUP FOR MEN FULL MEMBERS

$30 PER MEMBER PER EVENT

Do you have what it takes to join the winner’s circle for our Fairways Cup? Register for our next event today! 🏆Only $30 per member- includes drink specials & prizes!

Events will be both team & individual-based. All events will be flighted based on handicaps/#of players unless clarified. All Players MUST have a current established 18 Hole Handicap
Points awarded for end of year trip 

  • 1st Place- 60 Points
  • 2nd Place- 40 Points 
  • 3rd Place- 30 Points 

REMAINING EVENTS

  • August 4th | Individual Stoke Play (AM Tee Times)
  • August 25th | Member Guest, 2 Man 6-6-6 (8 AM start tee times)
  • September 14th & 15th | Men’s Club Championship
  • September 29 | Member/Member- 2 Net Best Ball (8 AM start tee times
  • October TBD | Top 5 point totals go to Titletown

Click HERE to register online!

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Sometimes the best thing you can do for your golf game isn’t employing advanced techniques. To master the game, you’ve got to ace the basics first. Check out this article we found by Todd McGill teaches you how to golf like a pro by using basic techniques.

Learn to play like the pros by mastering course management basics

By Todd McGill 

Source: Golf WRX

The line that is drawn between amateurs and professionals certainly covers more than one aspect. However, there are some things that anyone can do in order play like the pros and shoot better scores. Knowing how to plot your way around the course from tee to green is something that not many amateurs take into consideration, though it is something that professionals do so well. Learning how to play to your strengths and learning to take what the course gives you will ultimately lower your scores, no matter what your handicap.

From the tee
-Use sound judgment when setting up on the tee box by knowing what your miss is and playing for it. For example, for those that fade that ball, teeing the ball on the right side of the box allows you to play for your shot shape with more room for the ball to work. This is also the case for playing away from trouble, in being that lining up on the side of trouble allows you to play away from it.

-In some cases on short holes, make a note to hit your tee ball to where you leave yourself with a comfortable yardage for your approach. You don’t gain anything from hitting a driver if it leaves you with a feel shot from 30 yards when you could hit a wood or hybrid and leave yourself with a full club in. (This is also the case when hitting your second shot on a par 5)

Hitting into the green
-Know which pins you should attack and which ones you shouldn’t. The biggest mistake that many amateurs make is trying to hit the ball at a tucked pin. Even the professionals choose which flags to go at and which holes to play safe, making sure they leave themselves a putt rather than short siding themselves.

Chipping/Putting
-The biggest thing that gets us in trouble around the greens or on them is trying to make the ball go in the hole. It’s easy to get greedy with your shot and create the mindset that you have to make it when, in reality, it’s much more feasible to play for a three-foot circle around the hole. Leaving you an easy tap in. There is nothing more infuriating than a 3-putt.

I hope these tips will benefit your golf game by allowing you to manage your way around the golf course. The pros use these same approaches when they step on each hole, and it is imperative that you do also. We all may not have the ability that professionals do, but we can certainly learn things from them that will lower our scores.

Link to article: http://bit.ly/2MWSYxO

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We all use golf balls, but do you know what’s going on behind the scenes? Picking the right golf ball can make a big difference in your golf game. Check out this article we found on picking the right golf ball for you!

Seven Things You Need to Know About Golf Balls Before You Play

By James Roland

Source: GolfWeek

Internal differences make similar-looking golf balls perform in varying ways.

All golf balls look pretty much alike. But what’s inside the ball can affect the height and distance of shots and even how the ball will spin when it lands. So before you tee it up, find out more about the ball and how it can affect your game.

What will it cost

Golf balls vary greatly in quality and price, so before deciding on a particular make and model, know how much you can afford to spend and how quickly you go through a dozen golf balls. If you’re still learning or you lose a ball every couple of holes, you’ll want to stay away from the top-of-the-line balls, and, perhaps, consider used (or reclaimed) balls, which generally are cheaper than new balls.

Is it a distance ball?

A two-piece golf ball — a ball with a solid inner core and a hard cover — is designed to produce maximum distance. Typically, the hard cover is made of Surlyn. This type of ball is especially helpful for beginners or short hitters who need extra length on their shots. Because beginners tend to cut balls with poor shots or knock balls into trees and cart paths, the hard covers help those two-piece balls last longer.

Is it a performance ball

A high-performance ball is the most expensive ball on the market. It is made of multi-layer construction (three or four pieces) and uses a softer cover material, which allows for greater control, particularly around the green, and spin. Because of the softer cover materials, these types of balls are also the least durable. As a result, these balls are better fits for more experienced or expert players.

What’s the compression

Golf ball compression, which refers to the hardness and tightness of the core, is measured in numbers. The lowest compression commonly available is usually 80 (although lower compression balls are available). This compression level offers more distance but less control. A 100-compression (and higher) ball gives experienced golfers greater control. Inexperienced golfers and those who do not have a fast, solid swing, are unlikely to get any benefits from a higher compression ball. Most average golfers use a ball with a compression of 90.

What’s the spin

A softer cover, especially one made of balata or urethane, can give the ball extra spin, especially on shots for which you want a ball that will stop and back up on the green rather than roll forward off the green. Look for multi-layer construction with a softer cover if you’re looking for more spin on your shots.

What’s the ball’s condition

Before you tee up the first ball you find in your bag, take a moment to see if it has been scuffed or cut. The slightest deviation can adversely affect how the ball flies and how it lands. If it’s a casual round with a buddy and you don’t want to risk an expensive ball around a lake or stream, maybe the two of you can agree to try a sacrificial ball on those shots.

It’s worth experimenting

The more you play a particular type of ball, the better you’ll know whether it’s the right one for your game. If you try a different type every time out, you’ll never know what ball will help you reach your potential, so give each ball type at least a few rounds to see if you two are a good match.

Link to article: Click HERE

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WHAT YOU CAN LEARN FROM A LONG-DRIVE CHAMP

Source: GoflDigest
By 

As a former world long-drive champion, I often hear from regular golfers that they’ll never come close to being able to swing like me. Not true. You can. If you copy even a little of my technique, the ball is going to come off the face of your driver hotter than ever. Try these things the next time you’re on the range. 
By Justin James —with Ron Kaspriske

CHEAT THE SCALE

If you just stood on a scale, it would give you your body weight. But if you push down, that number will go up. When I make a backswing, I’m loading more than 100 percent of my body weight into my trail leg (right leg for righties). So really push into the ground with your trail leg as you take the club back. It will help you create and store a lot of energy.

GET OFF THE HEEL

As you swing back, it’s OK if your lead heel comes off the ground. That’s going to help you make a bigger backswing—especially if you’re not that flexible. You’ll really load up on your right side.

AVOID THE SWAY

Feel like someone standing behind your back is grabbing a belt loop near your right hip pocket and pulling it toward him. In other words, sink into that right hip as you swing back, which will keep you from swaying away from the target.

PLANT AND BUMP

To start your downswing, replant your left heel if you let it come off the ground. I mean really plant it. Try to leave an indentation in the turf. You’re using the ground to create energy for more swing speed. Also, let your left hip shift toward the target. This bump allows you to stay behind the ball with your upper body so you can apply all your weight to the strike.

GO WITH THE FASTBALL

I don’t think about pulling the handle of the driver down toward the ball, and I don’t think about releasing the club, either. Instead, I get the sensation I’m throwing a fastball with my right hand. It probably comes from my time as a minor-league pitcher. This feel will really boost your speed down into the ball.

SHOULDER THE LOAD

You want your club moving its fastest as it meets the ball. To make that happen, get the right shoulder facing the target as you finish the swing. It’s got to keep moving. As long as my lower body leads in the downswing, this turn helps blast the ball way down the fairway.

JUSTIN JAMES, 29, 6-foot-1, 215 pounds, won the 2017 World Long Drive Championship. He plays a Krank Formula X Snapper driver (48 inches, 3.5 degrees of loft). He hit a 435-yard drive to win the championship.

Link to article: Click HERE

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